Health Benefits

FriedEggsCompare225p85qThe frying pan tells the story

The orange yolks you see on the left of the pan are from pasture-raised chickens. The eggs with yellow yolks are from chickens that live in a building and are commonly available at the grocery store.

The difference in color is due to the difference in diet between these two types of chickens, with living green plants available only to chickens living on pasture.

All pasture-raised foods, including milk, chicken, turkey, beef, lamb, and pork, are nutritionally superior to foods raised in a feedlot or a building.

See nutrition test results of Forks Farm foods here nutritiontable

*Sources of data in tables above

Commodity meats – Nutrient Values of Muscle Foods, National Livestock and Meat Board, Ed. One, 1988 & USDA Nutrient Database for Standard Reference.

Pastured & Grass-fed meats – analyses of Forks Farm chicken, egg and beef performed by American Westech, Inc., Lancaster Laboratories, & West Virginia University Beef Research Project.

A note about this data – We don’t think saturated fat and cholesterol are bad; these constituents, like proteins and fatty acids, appear to be in every animal, pastured or not. These tables are presented to show that the levels of these constituents vary depending on how the animal is raised.

Pasture-raised is best.

Forks Farm Grass-fed beef has 8% more protein, 40% LESS calories, 90% LESS total fat, and 10% less cholesterol than standard grocery store beef!

Forks Farm Grass-fed beef has 8% more protein, 40% LESS calories, 90% LESS total fat, and 10% less cholesterol than standard grocery store beef!

“The profiles of omega-3s, saturated fat, cholesterol, calories, vitamin E and vitamin A are all better in grass-fed products because of what grass contains. Grass contains a whole host of macro and micro-nutrients. When an animal eats those components, they’re subsequently present in their foods. It’s not possible for grain-fed animals to get all those components. The other big thing is ruminants – cows and sheep – have digestive systems that are set up for foraging, and not for eating grains. When they eat grain they get sick more easily and require antibiotics. The diet can be supplemented, but it’s well known that you don’t absorb nutrients as well when they’re synthetic versus when you get them through food. The American Cancer Society advocates whole foods because of this.”

From an interview with Dr. Steve Marks
Eye surgeon, Geisinger Medical Center – Danville, PA

To learn the research on the benefits of grass-fed, visit

http://www.eatwild.com/
http://www.westonaprice.org/